Have You Thought About Kindle Scout? 


 Today I want to talk about a possible resource for writers (and readers) that I wasn’t previously aware of- Kindle Scout. 

 When a friend of mine told me this week that she was starting a Kindle Scout campaign I had no idea what she was talking about. Am I the only one? Perhaps everyone else in the world knows all about it. But then why is this the first time an author has told me they’re doing it? It seems like such a great idea. If, like me, you haven’t heard of it, or don’t know what it involves, read on… 

 Kindle Scout is a scheme in which you can upload details of a book you’ve written and start a campaign to have it published. The campaign lasts 30 days. During this time users of Kindle Scout can nominate your book for publication. The more nominations, the more likely your book will be selected for publication, though that isn’t the only criteria. And get this- if chosen, you’ll not only be published by kindle press, but receive a $1,500 advance, plus 50% royalties. And featured Amazon marketing! 

 This is a great thing for readers too. If a book you voted for gets a publishing deal, you will receive a free copy! And you’ll keep up to date with all the latest fiction, which is great if you’re a reviewer, or would like to be. 

 If you want more information, why not check out my friend Diana Tyler’s campaign to see how it’s done? While you’re there, please take a moment to nominate her book! All you need is an Amazon account. 

Diana’s book:


What if all the ancient myths are true? 

Why Being a Published Author Makes it Harder to Write

 

 My first book was published earlier this year. When I wrote it, it was with the possibility of a sequel in mind. Everyone who’s reviewed it so far has said they want a sequel. I’m going to write one. I really am. Honest. 

 So why have I only got as far as half a chapter? I didn’t have this problem with my first book. And it’s not as if I don’t know what to do with it, it’s all plotted out. Why can I not just sit down and write it? 

 I’ve come up with a few reasons: 

I know it’s going to be published. 

 When I wrote my first book, publication was a distant possibility. A dream really. So I wasn’t worrying about what other people would think of my work as I wrote. Now publication is a reality and it’s hard not to take that into account when writing. 

 I’m afraid it won’t live up to expectations. 

 What if the sequel doesn’t go the way my fans want it to? What if they’re unhappy with the character development, or which of her romantic interests my heroine chooses? Or what if they just don’t like it as much?

I’m very busy marketing my first book. 

 This is the real killer. I’ve let myself become so busy with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, my newsletter, and this blog, that I have no time for my next masterpiece! 

 I know there is only ONE SOLUTION for all of these issues. SIT DOWN AND WRITE!!!! So I’m taking a holiday at a remote Scottish island. For a week. Starting today. I won’t be blogging. I won’t be on my social media (much). I’m going to break the back of this sequel. Hopefully you’ll thank me later! Don’t go anywhere, I’ll be back in a week. 
See you then! 

An Interview with Author Krysten Lindsay Hager 


Krysten Lindsay Hager writes about friendship, self-esteem, fitting in, frenemies, crushes, fame, first loves, and values. She is the author of True Colors, Best Friends…Forever?, Next Door to a Star, Landry in Like, Competing with the Star (The Star Series: Book 2), and Dating the It Guy. Her debut novel, True Colors, won the Readers Favorite award. Krysten’s work has been featured in USA Today, The Flint Journal, the Grand Haven Tribune, the Beavercreek Current, the Bellbrook Times and on Living Dayton. In this interview she tells us about her inspirations, getting published and her advice to new writers. 


When did you start writing?

I’ve loved coming up with storylines since I was a little kid. I was always scribbling story ideas down and my fifth grade teacher told my parents she thought I’d be an author one day. I started writing more seriously in college and grad school. I was already writing for a newspaper during that time and I’d try to find time to work on book writing.

What was the first thing you ever had published?

I published short stories and essays and articles in magazines, newspapers, and online sites, but my first book was for preteens called, True Colors (Landry’s True Colors Series: Book One).

How did you end up with your current publisher?

I was in an online group for freelance writers. We motivated each other to find new places to publish articles and essays and a few of them were writing books as well. Two of them were with my first publisher and they were both happy there, so I filed that name in the back of my mind. Honestly, freelancing is such a great way to being as an author because you build a platform and learn how to handle things like having your work in public and dealing with reactions/criticism, etc.

What’s your writing fuel of choice? Tea, coffee, neat whisky?

Pepsi! And I do like a cup of tea at the end of the day.

Where do you write?

I moved a few months ago and now I have a new office—I just got bookshelves and was able to get my old books out of storage. I do a lot of my admin stuff and blog posts while watching the news in my living room.

What do you like to read?

I was just organizing my bookshelves and realized I own a lot of non-fiction! I have more fiction on my Kindle. I like biographies, YA, middle grade, new adult, contemporary novels, classics, mysteries, and I read all sorts of non-fiction like health books, self-help, Christian books, and current events.

Is there a particular author who has inspired you?

Several inspired me, but Paula Danziger, who wrote middle grade and YA, was the one who made me feel I was meant to make a career out of this. I read a bio on her and I saw some parallels with why she wanted to write for teens and my own feelings.

What advice would you like to pass on to new writers?

A lot of people ask me this and tell me their writing professors/teachers/mentors tell them they need to start publishing articles, etc. before they begin trying to get a book published and that’s a great idea. I was told to do this as well and not only do you build up your platform and get people to see what you can do, but you get experience in so many ways—exposure, clips for your bio, and experience dealing with public reactions.

Tell us about your latest book. What’s it about and what was the inspiration behind it?

Dating the It Guy is about a high school girl named Emme who winds up dating the son of a well-known senator. She goes through a lot of self-doubt as she watches his perfect ex-girlfriend trying to get him back and not feeling good enough for his new crowd. It’s a book about love, family, and learning to be yourself.


Where can we buy your book?

Purchase:

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XBFRX47

Amazon paperback: http://a.co/hBydoYm

Amazon UK Kindle: http://amzn.eu/6hqvKVu

Amazon UK Paperback: http://amzn.eu/7j0F4Y7

Barnes and Noble: http://bit.ly/2m5y9OC

Barnes and Noble Paperback: http://bit.ly/2n8vULZ

itunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/dating-the-it-guy/id1208876011?mt=11

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/dating-the-it-guy

Smashwords: www.smashwords.com/books/search?query=Dating+the+It+Guy

Another ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Review! 


 Victoria’s Victorian Victory is a charming, old fashioned novel set in Victorian times and reminded me very much of the writings of L.M. Montgomery, the Lark Rise to Candleford series and the Flambards trilogy by K.M. Peyton.

 Extremely well written, the novel is nicely paced with well developed, believable characters and a strong plot line. The author has obviously researched the period thoroughly, because the details were absolutely spot on, adding so much depth and authenticity you could almost smell the fresh cut hay and hear the mooing of the cows.

 Victoria’s Victorian Victory is about 14 year old Victoria Bloom, whose life is turned upside down after the death of her father. Expecting her older brother to take up the challenge of running the family farm, things take a turn for the worse when her brother Charlie is seduced away by the bright lights of London, leaving Victoria and her family to cope alone, with the rent due, a harvest to get in and the very real prospect of the workhouse looming before them.

 However, Victoria is not a girl to take adversity lying down and I think her character is one of the book’s main strengths. Almost modern in her thinking and outlook, Victoria is determined her family will keep their home. Not only that, she is convinced she can make the farm thrive and become more prosperous than ever.

 In this age of “kick ass” futuristic heroines, all in love with vampires or werewolves, it was a refreshing change to read a book where the heroine was just strong minded and independent because that’s her character. Not because she has super powers, or a destiny to fulfill, but just because her sheer grit, determination and stubbornness will never let her admit defeat. In Victoria’s eyes, an obstacle is there to be got around, and get around them she does. Often with a cheek and inventiveness that had me chuckling.
If there is one tiny flaw with the book, it’s that it ended too abruptly, leaving me wanting more of Victoria and her family. I am hopeful that the author has a sequel in mind as there is definitely, in my opinion, far more of Victoria’s tale to be told.

 All in all, a thoroughly lovely book, highly recommended.

Thanks to Julia Blake for this wonderful review of my baby! 

If this sounds like your sort of book then you can find it here on Amazon.com and here on Amazon.co.uk

Victorian Handicrafts


 I’ve decided to do an occasional article to feature some of the things I learned about Victorian history while researching for my book. After all, why waste all the knowledge?! 

 This article originally appeared in my February 2017 newsletter. If you enjoy it, why not sign up to receive one each month? You can do so on the contact page of this site. 

 If you happened to be an unmarried woman in either the upper or middle class of Victorian society, life could be, well, a bit dull. You were basically supposed to sit at home until you were married. In Pride and Prejudice, which of course was written a few years before the Victorian era but still applies, Charles Bingley says that all young ladies are accomplished: “They all paint tables, cover screens and net purses.”

 I think we can take it that this was a direct result of the boredom that would inevitably overtake a clever young woman with nothing to do all day. However, handicrafts have not completely died out with the movement of women to the workplace, so clearly they do have an appeal beyond this! Personally, I like to cross stitch and I’m learning to knit. 

 A Victorian craft that many women turned to that appeals to me, was painting their own tea-sets. I’d love to give you all a tea-set to paint, but since that’s not practical here’s a link to a free downloadable coloring page, so you can at least design your own. Here’s mine:

 Ok, so I’m not the worlds best artist, but I had fun! Hope you do too.